Chronologically, these three plays represent a very narrow era in Shaw’s oeuvre: a single decade. Yet the breadth of these plays’s themes, as well as the social moment each highlights, reveal individual and collective responses to social change, and/or war. When Shaw completed Pygmalion in 1913, no one knew the world would change utterly within a year. The Berlin premiere opened in October of 1913; the London production opened in April, 1914. By the time it transferred to New York in October of 1914, Europe was at war, but the United States was not yet involved, and Shaw became one of the only outspoken outliers regarding its support, which isolated him and damaged his social and theatrical reputation. Heartbreak House, Shaw’s play about the War, focused on the cluelessness and ineptness of those in power who did not heed the warning signs, or understand the catastrophe it would unleash....

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