This lively and engaging book explores the eighteenth century’s fascination with accounts and representations of women who dressed in men’s clothing. Klein’s aim is “to demonstrate the crucial role that cross-dressing narratives played in the eighteenth-century imaginary and how the portrayals of queer desires and trans bodies are inextricably a part of eighteenth-century discussions about what constitutes masculinity, whiteness, heterosexuality, and disability, as well as how these categories are at different times mutually constitutive of one another.” In pursuit of this aim, she ranges across a variety of genres, drawing out unexpected and vital connections between plebeian and higher-class women’s stories, popular and bourgeois texts, pamphlets and broadsides, biography and autobiography, poems, and novels. Stories of cross-dressing women, she suggests, “form their own narrative subgenre, one that connects what might otherwise appear to be disparate texts.”

Klein situates the work of Sapphic Crossings “at the intersection, at the crossing,...

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