Nearly every chapter in this collection makes an intelligent contribution to Irish studies; taking diverse critical approaches, several synthesize recent research. I single out six for special merit.

Marie-Louise Coolahan’s programmatic “Transition and the Early Modern” recognizes that pre-Union Ireland was not, pace Whig history, inevitably transitioning to modernity. Its Irish, Latin, English literatures were marked by an “edgy sense of flux” across linguistic boundaries. English’s “hegemony was not inevitable from the vantage point of transition, when everything was still to play for.” Indeed, “1,000 books in Latin were published by Irish authors [pre-1800], an embrace of print culture far more sustained and impactful than was achieved by” writers in English or Irish; Ireland was integral to the universal Baroque, the Latinate, Catholic culture radiating from Rome through Europe to Mexico City, Manila, and Macau. It was exiles, such as the Irish Franciscans at Louvain, whose print culture first posited...

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