Nicholas Rowe (1674–1718), dramatist, translator of French and the classics, editor of the first post-Folio Shakespeare edition (1709), and briefly poet laureate near the end of his life, remains today a familiar name although of late he has been relatively little read or studied. As a writer, he is best remembered for his contributions to “she tragedy,” but there has not been an attempt at anything like a complete edition of even the original work since the eighteenth century. James Sutherland published a popular edition of the three principal plays in 1929, and there have been paperback student editions of The Fair Penitent (1703) and The Tragedy of Jane Shore (1714), but heretofore there has been nothing like a seriously introduced and annotated old-spelling Works or even a relatively modest Plays and Poems that eschewed the rather bulky translations. The present attempt to remedy this lack has some virtues, but...

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