ABSTRACT

Unlike much of Twain’s short fiction, the satiric targets of “A Fable” are numerous, not singular; its tendentious moral invites dialogical interpretations of how “the mirror of one’s imagination” enriches, not impoverishes, an engagement with a text.

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