Globalization is this century's operative word. Barraged with worldwide news and views from such exotic and often dangerous locations as Southeast Asia, Brazil, Nepal, West Africa, New Zealand, Egypt, Israel, and Afghanistan, young American university students seem to have abandoned Paris and the traditional Cook's tour of historical Europe; now in search of public service and new experiences, they flock to Far and Near Eastern, South American, and African locales for postgraduate education in non-Western cultures. Yet despite this trend, in the last few years there has been a surprising renewal of interest in that old magnet for Americans: Paris. Perhaps the decline of high culture and romance in our cyber lives today is what draws writers and filmmakers to that traditional French icon of glamour, sexual sophistication, intellect, and art. To name just a few: David McCullough's prizewinning The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris; Graham Robb's An Adventure...

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