Literary studies, like much of the world, seems defined for the moment by its attention to borders and border-crossings, often geographic ones, but many other types as well. Once the terrain of ethnic American and diasporic literary studies, the language of borders and border crossings has become increasingly relevant to our conversations about literature and literary culture. This development should not be all that surprising. Even as it becomes more difficult for physical bodies to move across borders, technology has markedly increased transnational movement of just about everything else, including literary texts, our ideas about them, and our study of their reception. While Reading Together, Reading Apart: Identity, Belonging, and South Asian American Community has been fifteen years in the making according to author Tamara Bhalla, it comes along at just the right time to have a voice in shaping our current conversations about literature under transnationalism in the twentieth-first...

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