In the 2019 documentary Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror, scholar Tananarive Due says of fans of color, “We've always loved horror. It's just that horror hasn't always loved us.” This sentiment is not uncommon among minority fans of genres like science fiction, superhero, fantasy, and horror. Minorities must wrestle with their relative invisibility in online spaces and their hypervisibility in physical spaces like cosplay conventions. If they choose to make their voice known to express dissatisfaction over racist or xenophobic rhetoric, they run the risk of being deemed a “fandom killjoy” who brings conflict into the space of shared pleasure and happiness.

Rukmini Pande's new book Squee from the Margins: Fandom and Race operates through an examination of what it means to be a fandom killjoy: “for one's pleasure to threaten the invocation of a broadly inclusive, woman-centric, and queer-coded community” (13). She explores the alienation of...

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