Kinohi Nishikawa's Street Players: Black Pulp Fiction and the Making of a Literary Underground is a compelling literary history of Holloway House and its white merchants of sleaze—owner Bentley Morriss and editor Ralph Weinstock—who controlled the means of production and distribution of the black pulp universe for roughly two decades. Yet Nishikawa's expansive archival study of Holloway House's publishing ventures from the 1960s through the 1980s is at the same time a careful look at how readership intersects with race, class, gender, and taste to impact the production and reception of literature and culture. Nishikawa's groundbreaking structuralist analysis of the black literary underground is shaped by Pierre Bourdieu's conception of symbolic value and cultural production, Stuart Hall's anti-essentialist model of black cultural production, and Robert Darnton's theory of the communications circuit, which states that books come into being through a network which moves from the author to the publisher, the...

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