In advance of the 2017 International Holocaust Remembrance Day and within days of President Donald Trump's inauguration, software developers Russel Neiss and Rabbi Charlie Schwartz introduced a new name-reading Twitter account to the world: the St. Louis Manifest. The initiative recovered digital photographs from the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and tweeted them along with brief biographical details about the people in the photos. One showed a picture of four young children in the woods, with one child highlighted. The caption read, “My name is Lutz Grünthal. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered in Auschwitz.”

The tweets, of course, invoked a set of current crises, when calls to open borders to refugees from Burma, Syria, and other besieged countries—refugees who desperately sought self-preservation—met with triumphant and swift government edicts to close them. In addition to highlighting border closures, the Twitter project marked another moment...

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