Adrianna Link, Abigail Shelton, and Patrick Spero’s edited volume, Indigenous Languages and the Promise of Archives, is a treasure trove of information and strategies for scholars of Indigenous languages and archives, and for Indigenous language learners, tribal communities, and institutions such as museums, libraries, and archives. As Brian Carpenter clarifies in the preface, the book emerges from a 2016 conference, “Across Time and Space: Endangered Languages, Cultural Revitalization, and the Work of History,” and its three editors are or have been affiliated with the American Philosophical Society (APS). Yet while the book begins with APS, the contributors engage with diverse institutions, from the Beinecke Rare Books and Manuscripts Library to the Smithsonian Institution to the Minnesota History Center, and the collection discusses Indigenous communities and languages from across North America, including Anishinaabemowin, Cherokee, Dakota, Diidxazá, Gwich’in, Heiltsuk, Hopi, Maliseet, Menominee, Mi’kmaw, Niimíipuu, Oneida, Plains Indian sign language, Penobscot, Upper...

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