Reconsidering Longfellow is best understood as a pendant to Christoph Irmscher's Longfellow Redux (2006). That monograph urges scholars to reconceptualize the scale of the poetry of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807–82) in that it presents his work less as confessional and personal than as worldly, border-crossing, and oriented toward a readership imagined in expansive terms. This collection, edited by Irmscher and Robert Arbour, particularizes the effort to articulate Longfellow's interest to contemporary readers by providing ten essays that take us deeply into specific topics or poems. To be sure, as Longfellow Redux and works such as Leslie Eckel's Atlantic Citizens: Nineteenth-Century American Writers at Work in the World (2013) attest, the poet's reemergence has been driven primarily by transnational literary studies. His literary translations, his free use of such sources as the Finnish Kalevala (in The Song of Hiawatha [1855]), his deft negotiation of the transatlantic publishing market, and his rewriting...

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