Two of the papers in this edition came out of an interdisciplinary conference, “The Frightful and the Familiar: Exploring the Uncanny in the Ancient World,” held in 2018 at the University of Liverpool and generously funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council (North West Consortium Doctoral Training Partnership). The conference, which attracted an international program of speakers from classics, ancient history, comparative literature, and psychiatry, aimed to consider how modern aesthetic and psychoanalytic theories might inform studies of the ancient world, explore the post-Freudian Uncanny, and examine ancient understandings of phenomena which might be thought of as “uncanny” alongside their reception in modern culture.

In contrast to other academic disciplines in the humanities, classics has historically been slow to respond to the interventions of twentieth-century critical theorists, and slower still to incorporate theory as part of its pedagogical practices. Charles Martindale has humorously referred to the neophobic tendencies...

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