In early vampire literature, the Undead love to travel, but are stymied by logistics. Using the first Western vampire story as a point of origin, “The Vampyre” (1819) by John Polidori, the adventures begin with the human Aubrey and the vampire, Lord Ruthven, embarking on a Grand Tour of Europe, where the vampire’s true nature emerges. Subsequent vampire texts follow this same pattern of globe-trotting vampires, although many of them have restrictions, notably Count Dracula needing to repose in soil from his homeland in Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897). Other vampires, such as in Anne Rice’s Vampire Chronicles (1976–present), are prolific travelers.

It is in that spirit of global voyaging in foundational vampiric literary texts that Vampire Films Around the World: Essays on the Cinematic Undead of Sixteen Cultures (2020), edited by James Aubrey is literally grounded. This book fits nicely with other recent edited volumes that discuss globalism and vampires,...

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