The “notion of applying principles of ecocriticism to Victorian literature has been relatively late in developing; the field is still being shaped,” write Laurence W. Mazzeno and Ronald D. Morrison in their introduction to Victorian Writers and the Environment: Ecocritical Perspectives (Routledge, 2017), one of two essay collections on the topic to appear in 2017 (1). The other, Victorian Ecocriticism: The Politics of Place and Early Environmental Justice, edited by Dewey W. Hall, similarly suggests that “surprisingly, there has been limited work about the growing field of ecocriticism as an approach to Victorian Studies. The research has been scant, revealing a dearth with journal articles interspersed” (8). The appearance of two volumes devoted to ecocritical approaches to Victorian texts within the same year speaks perhaps to the larger shift in ecocriticism away from a study of literature whose focus is on the relationship between humans and “nature”—to which the...

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