Any scholar engaged in the practice of ecocriticism, or in Romantic poetry and its engagement with the material world, will find much of interest in the deeply considered essays of Romantic Ecocriticism: Origins and Legacies, part of the Lexington series “Ecocritical Theory and Practice.” In practice, “Romanticism” is here mostly represented by its more canonical poets, and especially Wordsworth, around whom the anxieties of ecologists and ecocritics converge. Most of the volume’s essays set out to reclaim Romanticism for ecological or at least proto-ecological thinking, cementing the movement in a place it has held, despite intermittent challenges, since the early nineteenth century. If this leads the contributing authors to the occasional moment of defensiveness, and the inflation of various interlocutors’ limited and poorly contextualized arguments only to demolish them, they can be forgiven in light of the urgency of our predicament. As we face a cataclysmic sixth mass extinction...

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