The thirteen interdisciplinary essays assembled in this volume demonstrate that transatlantic German Studies scholars are at the forefront of cultural studies research on the Anthropocene, the period in the last two hundred years in which human activity has significantly changed the earth. The contributors, all affiliated with the main German center for environmental humanities scholarship, the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, offer innovative examinations of German-language literature, film, photography, philosophy, illustrated periodicals, critical theory, and locations. The essays address how this new geological period was anticipated and represented in literature and art, and they explore the Anthropocene’s meaning for aesthetics, poetics, politics, and scientific knowledge. The interpretations thus underscore the varied ways cultural products reflect on how humans have changed the planet, and the contributors do not neglect the role of non-human agency and representations in the works they examine.

The editors’ introduction, Sabine...

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