In the twenty-one years since The Lost Luna Baedeker and Becoming Modern: The Life of Mina Loy were published, Loy’s work has slowly made its way into textbooks and syllabi across the country. Nonetheless, blink and there’s a good chance you will still miss Mina Loy—or at the very least, confuse her for a star of the silent screen. Two decades on and it remains as true for a volume of Modernist researchers as it does for undergraduates across the country. And it is the issue that drives Tara Prescott’s much-needed tandem analysis of Loy’s life and work, Poetic Salvage: Reading Mina Loy. Early on, Prescott reasserts a comment made by Caroline Burke: that Loy is a figure caught only in “glimpses”; an artifact herself, seen alongside artists such as Joyce and Freud, Williams and Duchamp, but rarely pursued herself on an academic stage (xi). Even as more work...

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