Thomas Trzyna’s latest book represents the first comprehensive attempt to apply the interdisciplinary theories of the philosopher of science Karl Popper to literary analysis. In an accessible and cogent fashion, Trzyna persuasively maintains that a Popperian approach to understanding literature “can be used as a teaching tool as well as an interpretive framework for scholars” (3). After outlining what a Popperian framework for reading a complex literary work might encompass in chapters 1 and 2, Trzyna compares Popper’s ideas to those of the theorist James Battersby in the following section. In the remaining chapters, Tzryna demonstrates a formidable grasp of world literature, both secular and religious, from various traditions in his proposed Popperian interpretations of Jean Toomer’s Karintha, the works of Henry Fielding, J. M. G. Le Clézio’s Désert, J. M. Coetzee’s The Childhood of Jesus, Shakespeare’s Timon of Athens, Jonathan Littell’s novel Les Bienveillantes,...

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