Betsy Wood (History, Hudson County Community College) contributes to the historiography of child labor reform in America, showing the ways reformers responded to shifts in North–South sectional ideological, political, social, and moral disputes of free labor versus unfree labor in an expanding, maturing industrial capitalist society from the 1850s to the 1930s. Stating interest “in what debates about child labor over time would reveal about the legacy of sectionalist conflict within an emerging capitalist society,” Wood adds an understanding of the hostile battles over child labor (2). She argues “that debates about children and their labor brought to the fore opposing visions of labor, freedom, morality, and the market in the modern industrial age. . . . [when] both sides were attempting to negotiate, materially and spiritually, the changes wrought by capitalism” (6). Wood penned five chapters on the history of the child labor reform movement that illustrates Americans struggling...

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