We become entangled or enthralled in the pieces left behind by historic potters. We seek out objects that are attractive to us, often because of their aesthetic beauty or a deeper, personal connection to them, but we tend to forget about the businesses behind the objects. Scott Suter weaves a narrative of material culture as the social and cultural explorations of not just objects, but the manufacture of goods and the people who made them. A Potter's Progress: Emanuel Suter and the Business of Craft traces the evolution of Emanuel Suter's pottery business in the second half of the nineteenth century from one of traditional methods to mechanized, industrial manufacturing that introduced the use of steam power to his operations. The very study of craft as a business and not as a cottage industry perhaps stretches the modern definitions of craft, and explores potter Emanuel Suter's progressive approach to industry,...

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