Gifford Pinchot remains important in Pennsylvania history for his terms as governor and in national history for building the American conservation movement. Char Miller's and Bibi Gaston's books help to explain how he achieved this. Pinchot combined his love of nature with bureaucratic practicality, and it was through his proactive administrative methods that he built a particularly American version of environmental consciousness. A key bureaucratic action made during Pinchot's career was his relocating the federal Division of Forestry from the Department of Interior to the Department of Agriculture in 1905. Pinchot believed that the forest would be best preserved if treated as a crop (72). This ideology allowed him to manage the environment as a resource. There was some animosity regarding this approach. Preservationists like John Muir clashed with Pinchot's decision to allow public lands to be used for commercial use. Preservationists sought to free the environment from exploitation. Pinchot...

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