Keeping up with the constantly growing volume of original archeological data and interpretation is a perennial problem for scholars in Pennsylvania and the mid-Atlantic region, as it is worldwide. The need is only partially met by attending state and regional archaeological conferences, like the annual meetings of the Society for Pennsylvania Archaeology (SPA), the Eastern States Archaeological Conference (ESAF), and the Middle Atlantic Archaeological Conference (MAAC). The expansion of publicly funded, so-called cultural resource management (CRM) archaeological investigations over the past thirty-five years has only exacerbated the problem. While all such studies produce detailed technical reports, they are inaccessible to the general public. Fortunately, in recent years the results of CRM studies are being published as articles in publications such as River Chronicles, one of several journals, alongside more traditional (academic, museum-based, and avocational) archaeological studies. Detailed reporting and interpretation of a wide range of current archaeological research are...

You do not currently have access to this content.