Beverly Tomek's Colonization and Its Discontents is an important contribution to a growing scholarship on the African colonization movement. Although focused on a single state, Tomek examines the complex relationship between colonization and other branches of the abolitionist movement more thoroughly than any previous historian. As Tomek shows, “Pennsylvania offers an excellent lens through which to view the changes that took place within the American antislavery community” between the American Revolution and the Civil War (1). A number of factors combined to make Pennsylvania exceptionally important within the antislavery movement, including its geographic position as a northern border state and its tradition of Quaker benevolence. The state was home to the Pennsylvania Abolition Society (or PAS, established in 1784), which advocated the gradual abolition of slavery; the Pennsylvania Colonization Society (PCS, created in 1826), one of the most important auxiliaries of the American Colonization Society (ACS); and the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery...

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