In 1971 the Honorable Thomas M. Rees of California observed that “very little has been written of what the Welsh have contributed in all walks of life to the shaping of American history.”1 In 1979 historian David Galenson maintained that “the issue of the composition of America's early immigrants is an important one and will continue to receive considerable attention from historians who seek to understand the social and economic history of colonial America.” However, Douglas Greenburg's examination of the historiography of the middle colonies revealed that Pennsylvania, which witnessed the immigration of many early modern Welsh Quaker migrants, has not attracted as much attention from researchers as has its neighboring states. In 1992, twenty-one years after Rees's observations, Aaron Fogelman noted, “there is little literature on Welsh immigration in eighteenth-century America and quantitative estimates are virtually non-existent.” In 1994 Wayne Bodle showed that, during the preceding fifteen years,...

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