Nietzsche’s Earth is an ambitious work of expansive scope, which builds on several of Shapiro’s previous articles and contributions to anthologies. Shapiro’s comprehensive interpretation of Nietzsche’s reflections on time and “great politics,” while heavily informed by the thought of Deleuze, Guattari, and Agamben, remains firmly and admirably situated in the historical and ideological contexts in which Nietzsche lived and wrote. The stated goal of the book is to “triangulat[e Nietzsche’s] thought between nineteenth-century versions” of Hegel’s notion that his time was the “desired culmination of the world” (ix) and certain prevailing contemporary attitudes that in some respects look awfully close to this Hegelian idea, such as “apocalyptic religious passions” or “the apparent supremacy of the global market” (understood either as a laudable achievement or as an inevitability to which we should resign ourselves). Here, Shapiro aims to compile an instructive Nietzschean account, one that informs how we think about such...

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