This volume collects eight essays on Nietzsche and Dostoevsky written by scholars from different humanities fields. What unites them is the idea that, after more than a century, the writings of Nietzsche and Dostoevsky and the relations between them still represent a major challenge for contemporary readers. The range of subjects that the authors tackle is wide, from crime, truth, art, and nihilism to pessimism, tragedy, and the unconscious. The result is a stimulating collection of essays that explore some of the similarities, as well as the radical differences, between two of the greatest minds of the nineteenth century.

The first essay is written in a literary style by Geoff Waite and Francesca Cernia Slovin, who consider both the question of Nietzsche's discovery and reading of Dostoevsky (with particular attention to the broad cultural context in which this discovery takes place) and the question of crime and the criminal, common...

You do not currently have access to this content.