The editors of Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity claim with some justification that few philosophers, and even fewer classicists, have “taken the time to understand [Nietzsche] on his own terms as a scholar of antiquity” (xviii). “Our primary aim,” Jensen and Heit say, “is to show not how Nietzsche's earlier works on antiquity help us to understand Nietzsche, but how they may improve our understanding of antiquity.” I shall suggest that not every contribution to the collection succeeds in that primary aim.

Two chapters are reprints of older pieces: Jonathan Barnes's “Nietzsche and Diogenes Laertius” (1986) and Glenn W. Most and Thomas Fries's “Die Quellen von Nietzsches Rhetorik-Vorlesung” (1994), translated in shortened form as “The Sources of Nietzsche's Lectures on Rhetoric.” Barnes examines Nietzsche's work on the sources of Diogenes Laertius, and his Grundhypothese that Diogenes's major source was Diocles of Magnesia. By analyzing parts of the text of...

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