Analyzing the reception of Nietzsche's work in the years following World War I is a delicate and important task, one that Nietzsche nella Rivoluzione conservatrice seeks to accomplish by focusing on the so-called Conservative Revolutionary movement and the prominent intellectuals who orbited it. The book is a rich summary of the eponymous congress held in Bologna (May 10–13, 2013), promoted by the University of Bologna and the Fondazione Gramsci Emilia-Romagna, and it contains fifteen essays from both young and established scholars, including the editors of the volume, preceded by a short yet informative introduction.

“Conservative Revolutionary” is an almost paradoxical expression, chosen by Armin Mohler in 1950 to define major philosophical, political, and cultural currents in Germany between the end of World War I and the rise of the Nazi regime. Like every definition, Mohler's has clear limits, but it succeeds in identifying the core of this movement: Nourished by...

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