One methodological principle that shows the contemporary value of Nietzsche's thought is the task of “seeing things, as they are!,” for which the only way is “to be able to see them from a hundred eyes, from many persons!” (KSA 9:11[65]). Along with many others, this passage indicates the attitude of a philosopher intent on fruitfully examining multiplicity and difference. In his volume, translatable as Nietzsche's New Infinite: Future Objectivity between Art and Science, Marco Vozza highlights Nietzsche's propensity to study multiple, often apparently contradictory phenomena through an analysis that is not comparative but reciprocally penetrating. Such an approach is what the Italian author calls “binocular optics,” although we might speak more of multiocular optics.

From his very brief introduction—whose title, “Why Nietzsche in Times of Realism?,” echoes Hölderlin's verse “wozu Dichter in dürftiger Zeit”—the author means to situate his work in a dual context....

You do not currently have access to this content.