The fact that a second edition of this Nietzsche-Lexikon has appeared only two years after the publication of the first indicates—as its editor, Christian Niemeyer, suggests in his new introduction—that, even in the age of the Internet, there is still a demand for compact information between two book covers. (Or does it reveal something about the comparatively slow rollout of broadband in Germany?) Surprisingly, in 2009 as now, there are no competitors to this Nietzsche-Lexikon, although other reference works to date have included a Nietzsche-Handbuch (ed. Henning Ottmann [Metzler, 2000]), a lexicon of Nietzsche's contemporaries (ed. Hauke Reich [Schwabe, 2004]), a handbook to Wagner and Nietzsche (ed. Stefan Lorenz Sorgner, H. James Birx, and Nikolaus Knoepffler [Rowohlt, 2008]), the major project to produce a Nietzsche-Wörterbuch (edited by the Nietzsche Research Group in Nijmegen), an Oxford Handbook of Nietzsche (ed. Ken Gemes and John Richardson [Oxford University Press, 2013]), and...

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