Nietzsche has some striking thoughts on the passions. In a note from the end of 1880 he writes that without the passions the world is reduced to simply “quantity and line and law and nonsense,” presenting us with “the most repulsive and presumptuous paradox” (KSA 9:7[226]).1 Indeed, Robert Solomon has argued that Nietzsche attacks the modern stress on epistemology within philosophy and seeks to return philosophy to its true vocation as a doctrine of the passions. For Solomon, the title The Gay Science, signals a defense of the passionate life, since la gaya scienza is a life of longing and love.2 This special issue of JNS has been put together with a view to exploring and illuminating Nietzsche as a philosopher of the passions. The suggestion is not, however, that he is a philosopher of the passions at the expense of reason. We have no desire...

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