The past two decades have seen a marked increase in the number of monographs relating specifically to Phoenician identity and material culture. Even in such a context, the work under review stands apart for its ambitious, comprehensive scope that advances both a critique of persistent disciplinary Hellenocentrism and a synthesis of archaeological data. Together those objectives prompt a revision of persistent narratives about Phoenician colonial presence, influence, and agency in the first-millennium-BCE Mediterranean.

The volume is divided into two parts, with an introduction that lays out the study’s approach, which is (part 1) a critical examination and diagnosis of the historiographic problems confronting the study of Phoenician identity and (part 2) a comprehensive Mediterranean survey of mainly archaeological evidence for Phoenician presence and activity. In chapters 1 and 2, López-Ruiz shows how the study of the Phoenicians both falls between historical disciplinary boundaries and has also been distorted by historiographic...

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