It is difficult to imagine a better venue for a review of this new “history of a global city” than Mediterranean Studies, which aims to discuss “the ideas and ideals of Mediterranean cultures from antiquity to the present and the influence of these ideas beyond the region’s geographical boundaries.” At least, no better subject can be imagined for “vibrant conversations across several disciplines,” which the journal aspires to stimulate, than a history of Jerusalem.

To state in advance some of the difficulties posed by the millennial history of the Holy City, it is not so simple to do justice to a subject that is both real and imagined, where the sources are vast and yet limited to those that survived the ravages of time or happened to become institutions of memory, such as the canon of biblical scriptures, the works of Josephus Flavius, and the famous band of Qur’anic...

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