In the two hundred years that have passed since the death of Napoleon Bonaparte, the epoch to which he gave his name—an accolade unique in the historical usage: we do not, for example, speak of the years from 1933 to 1945 as the Hitlerian age—has become one of the most well-studied periods in European history. Thus, the flood of publications has been boundless and continues to flow unchecked. However, until relatively recently, the vast majority of the works on offer have been very traditional in their approach with the focus very much on biographies of the French ruler and his leading contemporaries, narratives of the military campaigns, or studies of individual battles. Lamentably enough, much of what appears in print continues to conform to this model, but the past three or four decades have seen the emergence of a “new Napoleonic history” that is far more analytical in character and...

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