The story of UNESCO in the history of post–Second World War internationalism and globalization is one that is increasingly occupying scholars. In Books Across Borders, Miriam Intrator, book and library historian and currently Special Collections librarian at Ohio University, makes an important contribution to this growing body of work. She focuses her attention on the story of the earliest days of UNESCO as the fledgling organization sought to play a guiding role in the cultural reconstruction of war-ravaged Europe. Her primary focus is the work that was undertaken in France and Poland, as well as the overarching politics, activities, and ideologies of UNESCO.

As Intrator and others have made clear, the Second World War's catastrophic impact included the looting and destruction of books and printed material, as well as the ideological manipulation and censorship of print by numerous regimes, most notably that of Nazi Germany. During the war, Nazi...

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