“Summer of Soul: A Special Issue of The Langston Hughes Review” examines Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson’s Academy-Award winning 2021 documentary, Summer of Soul (. . . Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised),1 which focuses on previously unreleased footage of African American and Latino musicians performing an array of styles and genres at the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival that also featured comedians. But musicians, especially soul and gospel artists, were main attractions. Three hundred thousand people attended events at Mount Morris Park, the site of the festival. Hal Tulchin, the late filmmaker, recorded the footage, but Hollywood executives had difficulty locating an audience. And since Questlove is a famous drummer and well-known writer, it seems fitting that his debut film explores what Black music meant to people who attended the festival and to the artists themselves. Inasmuch as soul enthralled listeners from different backgrounds as well as...

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