In her posthumously published work, To Live Like a Moor: Christian Perceptions of Muslim Identity in Medieval and Early Modern Spain, Olivia Remie Constable analyzes Christian perceptions of Muslim cultural practices in late medieval and early modern Iberia. Constable shows how once-tolerated customs surrounding food, clothing, and hygiene were increasingly infused with religious significance following the forced conversion of Iberian Muslims. She traces the growing Christian condemnations of certain morisco (communities of Muslims who were forcibly converted to Christianity) customs surrounding food, clothing, and hygiene thought to be holdover religious practices maintained by the recently converted moriscos. These dietary, hygienic, and clothing-related customs were viewed with suspicion by the Christian authorities and subject to suppression in the late medieval and early modern peninsula even as moriscos themselves worked to separate cultural practices from their former religious rituals.

Constable first tackles the subject of clothing and appearance and the relationship...

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