Many years ago, a senior medievalist recommended further investigation of Ordericus to me, given my interest in early twelfth-century historiography. This scribe/copyist/author does not disappoint; he is a fascinating and somewhat unique character (1075–1142) who spent his monastic career of some thirty years at the Norman abbey of Saint-Evroult, where he composed his principal works, the Historia Ecclesiastica and Gesta Normannorum ducum, medieval chronicles now seen as critical and vivid milestones of European historical writing. The essays here, dedicated en hommage to Marjorie Chibnall, are both retrospective and prospective, in that they consider Ordericus's life and works, taking into consideration the disciplines of both English-language and medieval manuscript studies, archaeology, hagiography, liturgy, music, theology, and cultural memory studies, among other subjects. In the wake of the conquest, Ordericus incorporated civil war and peacetime in Normandy into his works, as Saint-Evroult was open to all the conflicts of a changing...

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