In the wake of the no-longer-so-new “new modernist studies,” many scholars have expressed dismay at how the field continues to be constrained by the rubric of aesthetic modernism. This framework has proven especially limiting for the recovery of women writers, who some feel have not fared as well as their male counterparts in the expansion of the canon over the past two decades.1 Lucy Delap and Marie DiCenzo argue that feminist scholars need to do more than widen the lens of modernism to include a greater array of print-artifacts (like suffrage fiction or feminist periodicals) or more token women writers (like Dora Marsden and Rebecca West). To get a fuller picture of women's modernity, instead of expanding the category, they argue, we need to abandon it.2 Their own path-breaking work exemplifies the potential of this approach.

The volumes reviewed in this essay make welcome contributions to the increasingly...

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