In January 1929, Sibley Watson came to the Dial offices to tell Marianne Moore that the magazine was closing. Launched by Watson and Scofield Thayer in 1920, the Dial played a significant role in the development of literary modernism. Most famously known for its landmark publication of T. S. Eliot's The Waste Land in 1922, the Dial was “one of the great tastemakers of the twentieth century,” as Adam McKible has shown.1 But, despite its considerable influence and prestige, the magazine was never profitable. Finally forced to relinquish this financial burden, Thayer and Watson decided that the magazine's last issue would be in July. Moore handled the news with characteristic grace. She thanked Thayer and Watson for providing her with some of the most “rewarding” work of her career, and she wrote to her brother, Warner Moore, to reassure him that she would be fine: “Any powers I have...

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