Lahcen El-Yazghi Ezzaher offers the first English translation of Averroes’s MiddleCommentary on Aristotle’s Rhetoric. The book is divided into a brief introduction (1–19), the translated text (23–272), notes (275–290), a bibliography (291–297), and an index (299–310).

In the introduction, Ezzaher provides a short overview of Averroes’s life and work that is based on the work of the thirteenth-century bibliographer and biographer Ibn Abī Uṣaybiʿa (d. 668/1267–70). Nonspecialist readers may feel disappointed to read that “for more biographical information” they will have to turn to Ernest Renan’s Averroès et l’averroïsme, published in 1852 (275 n. 4). More recent references could have been given here to shed light on the text and especially its philosophical background. Averroes (d. 595/1198) is one of the falāsifa philosophers—such as al-Kindī (d. ca. 256/870), al-Fārābī (d. 339/950), and Avicenna (d. 428/1037)—who built on the heritage of Greek philosophy. Following the Alexandrians, the falāsifa...

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