Engaging in social action means making ethical choices. While most normative ethical theories focus on deliberating over the correct action to resolve an ethical dilemma, Aristotle’s ethical system, developed most clearly in the Nicomachean Ethics, does something different: it backgrounds the choosing of an action to profile the character who makes the choice. In Paula Gottlieb’s Aristotle on Thought and Feeling, the main argument is that Aristotle provides a unique ethical system in this regard. While some modern philosophers want to read Aristotle in a “Kantian style,” where reason governs over feelings and desires, and others want to read him in a “Humean style,” where feelings and desires motivate actions, Gottlieb argues that Aristotle’s ethical system is sui generis—it is a unique kind, different from either reason-driven or feeling-driven systems (4–6). What Aristotle provides is a way of understanding ethics from the interdependence of thoughts (logos)...

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