Many of the classics of medieval Jewish philosophy begin with a lament about the state of Jewish thought in their time. I would never have written this, they plead, but for the confusion of our generation, who have forgotten what they once knew, or who have been led astray by foreign ideas, or who simply wander about in a maze with no one to guide them. Contemporary academic philosophy and theology tend to be more modest, usually claiming only that a particular subfield has failed to appreciate a narrow point about some individual thinker or tradition. But Randi Rashkover powerfully and effectively revives the old lament in her latest work, Nature and Norm, which argues that “a good deal of modern and contemporary Jewish and Christian thought” suffers from “an inability to articulate clear and meaningful claims, an inclination towards utopian theopolitical positions, a vulnerability to skepticism, a tendency...

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