Given the recent surge of interest in re-exploring the work and thought of the early twentieth-century philosopher Hermann Cohen, it is interesting to consider the value of Rabbi Steven Schwarzschild's essays collected in the present volume edited by George Y. Kohler. Certainly Cohen scholarship has advanced since the 1950s-1980s when these essays were composed and published. What function do they currently fulfill in the contemporary scene? To answer this question, one has to remember the state of Cohen reception during that period. Only decades after the Second World War, Cohen was written off by as a sad reminder of a bygone era's optimism over German-Jewish and Christian-Jewish dialogues that (as Gershsom Scholem was to remark) were fatefully one-sided. Many of those who did take him seriously were influenced by the philosopher Franz Rosenzweig's important (if strategic) introduction to Cohen's Jewish writings purporting to show that the later Cohen (in Religion...

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