David Novak's latest book, Jewish Justice: The Contested Limits of Nature, Law, and Covenant (Baylor University Press, 2017), is a collection of his recent essays on subjects ranging from capital punishment to the iggun crisis to the Jewish and Christian reception of thinkers like Moses Mendelssohn, Reinhold Niebuhr, and Karl Barth.1 As with Novak's work as a whole, there are two levels upon which a reviewer must engage with this collection. The first level concerns Novak's broader claims about the universal warrants within particular Jewish texts and traditions, and the roles that Jewish particularity can and should play in a pluralistic public square. The second level concerns the specific arguments Novak makes regarding practical questions of contemporary social ethics, and what he classifies as universal moral claims. On this first level, Jewish Justice is, like much of Novak's work, a thoughtful and provocative contribution to a field that sometimes...

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