Archaeology and Archaeological Information in the Digital Society, edited by Isto Huvila, brings together a range of studies by archaeologists and information scientists to examine the implications of digital technologies on archaeological interpretation and how we engage with the past. Digital data collection and the embedding of digital media in interpretation and presentation means that archaeologists are all engaging in some way in “digital society.” This volume highlights the various and many ways that we do so, and how digital technologies impact how we interface with archaeology—from field data collection to archiving to public presentation.

In the volume's introduction, Huvila states, “There is no digital archaeology and no digital society” (p. 1) but rather just archaeology and society, which are both infused with digital technologies in contemporary culture to the point that “digital” represents an inextricable and often unnoticed part of how we work and interact. As Huvila notes,...

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