Certainly, the field of archaeology has evolved in recent decades, reacting to changing environments not only in higher education in North America but also to challenges “on the ground.” Shifting political climates in the Middle East and Mediterranean have impacted the field and so have the numerous new tools and methods for fieldwork, research, publication, and training. Career trajectories in archaeology, like other academic fields, have become less straight forward, with practices adjusting to new institutional and administrative structures and also to the needs of new generations of students. These developments are well documented and much discussed in various venues; in this Forum, I focus on the implications of these developments and my reaction to this climate—the manner in which I adapted and applied skills acquired through archaeological training and professional experiences beyond a traditional academic trajectory.

Until recently, I remained focused on a traditional career path in archaeology. I...

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