Old World archaeology used to be a rich man's hobby, but now it's a poor person's job. Historical antecedents are a good guide to the evolution of the discipline as the famous (and infamous) antiquarians and excavators of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries AD, like the Earl of Elgin, Heinrich Schliemann, and Arthur Evans, all had money or made enough to conduct their own operations in the field, while those who began turning the pursuit into a profession, like William M. F. Petrie, lacked private means and had a long struggle to make ends meet. Less worthy than any of these were Luigi and Alessandro Palma di Cesnola and Max Ohnefalsch-Richter, who financed themselves from the sale of Cypriot antiquities without adding much that is reliable to our knowledge of the island's ancient history. Fortunately, that option is not available to us today. Two centuries ago the study of...

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