Kersel's essay addresses fundamental concerns in cultural heritage management that are starkly felt in eastern Mediterranean and Middle Eastern countries and states that may have limited resources or training to implement long-term curation strategies for burgeoning archaeological collections. Kersel focuses on cultural heritage priorities, including physical storage infrastructure, jobs, and training in the field, and goes on to raise the question of whether partage, deaccessioning, or long-term lending policies should be considered by state-run or national antiquities departments as partial solutions to the challenges of heritage staffing and infrastructure. Here, I respond to those questions and offer some broad alternatives that might help to partially alleviate the crisis, while also building sustainability for future heritage management within the eastern Mediterranean. Institutions from overseas that participate in archaeological projects in the eastern Mediterranean can and should actively seek out new opportunities for building partnerships through the sharing of collections, research...

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